Educate! partners with governments to deliver the skills-based education students need through national education systems.

 

 

Educate!’s long-term vision is inherently sustainable:

For us, ultimate success means creating long-term impact by incorporating our model of skills-based education into national education systems across Africa. 

We engage with governments to support reforms to the national curriculum, exams, and teacher training so that the innovations we make today impact as many students as possible and help generations of students to come.

We encourage governments and schools to adapt and integrate our evidence-based approach as they undertake education reforms to help prepare students for life after school. By working both at the policy level and at the school level, Educate! is able to provide locally-relevant solutions that answer the needs of ministries, schools and families.  

Drawing from our experience on the ground, we advise national governments on curriculum, design, teacher training initiatives, and school management practices to ensure that students graduate with the skills they need to solve poverty. Our vision is for national education systems to be drivers of sustainable development.

 

Government Engagement Progress

 

Educate! has been invited by national governments across Africa to share the secrets of our success for greater system-wide impact.

2015

  • Rwanda: Educate! signed an MOU with the Rwandan government to incorporate the Skills Lab and Student Business Club components of the Educate! model into the government’s competency-based reforms to be rolled out across Rwanda. With partners EDC and Akazi Kanoze, Educate! ran a training of trainers to support Rwanda's secondary school teachers in integrating the Skills Lab into their classrooms. 
                 Rwanda

                 Rwanda

Previously, I used to teach innovation and creativity but I wouldn’t give students a chance to come up with products from their environment. However, after going through the training on how skills lab work, I went back to my school and taught the same lesson better; I told the students to go, explore the environment and come up with products. Students surprised me.
— Harriet Mansikombi, an entrepreneurship teacher in Rwanda

 

  • Uganda: Educate! continues to work with the Ugandan government to include skills-based learning in secondary education by:
  • Beyond: Educate! invited the Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development to tour our program in Uganda. This visit was a follow-up to Educate!'s Global Education Conference in April, where delegates from four countries (Kenya, Uganda, Cameroon, Rwanda) attended and spoke about their shared belief in the importance of competency-based education. Finally, in early 2015 Amon Charities and the Ministry of Education in Cameroon invited Educate! to advise and provide training for an Entrepreneurship Pilot program.
                                                                     Cameroon

                                                                     Cameroon

                                                                          Kenya

                                                                          Kenya

2014

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Educate! signed a Memorandum Of Understanding (MOU) with the Ugandan government, encouraging schools to work with Educate! and outlining that the Ministry of Education will look at Educate!'s impact and consider adoption of program components based on that evidence. We were thrilled to deepen our partnership and move closer to our goal of sustainability through government engagement.

 

2012

  • Educate!  supported Uganda's government in nationally integrating a more practical entrepreneurship curriculum and student business club structure. This curriculum now reaches more than 50,000 youth annually.

  • According to a leading Ugandan newspaper, 45% of Ugandan schools now have active Student Business Clubs.

  • Educate! supported the Ugandan government in improving a national exam to evaluate what students actually accomplish in the business clubs, as well as their experience assessing markets – changes which greatly increased incentives for students to start businesses while in school.